Understanding Voting Patterns at AKOS Workshop

Two days ago we held another Introduction to Data Mining workshop at our faculty. This time the target audience was a group of public sector professionals and our challenge was finding the right data set to explain key data mining concepts. Iris is fun, but not everyone is a biologist, right? Fortunately, we found this really nice data set with ballot counts from the Slovenian National Assembly (thanks to Parlameter).

Related: Intro to Data Mining for Life Scientists

Workshop for the Agency for Communication Networks and Services (AKOS).

 

The data contains ballot counts, statistics, and description for 84 members of the parliament (MPs). First, we inspected the data in a Data Table. Each MP is described with 14 meta features and has 18 ballot counts recorded.

Out data has 84 instances, 18 features (ballot counts) and 14 meta features (MP description).

 

We have some numerical features, which means we can also inspect the data in Scatter Plot. We will plot MPs’ attendance vs. the number of their initiatives. Quite interesting! There is a big group of MPs who regularly attend the sessions, but rarely propose changes. Could this be the coalition?

Scatter plot of MPs’ session attendance (in percentage) and the number of initiatives. Already an interesting pattern emerges.

 

The next question that springs to our mind is – can we discover interesting voting patterns from our data? Let us see. We first explored the data in Hierarchical Clustering. Looks like there are some nice clusters in our data! The blue cluster is the coalition, red the SDS party and green the rest (both from the opposition).

Related: Hierarchical Clustering: A Simple Explanation

Hierarchical Clustering visualizes a hierarchy of clusters. But it is hard to observe similarity of pairs of data instances. How similar are Luka Mesec and Branko Grims? It is hard to tell…

 

But it is hard to inspect so many data instances in a dendrogram. For example, we have no idea how similar are the voting records of Eva Irgl and Alenka Bratušek. Surely, there must be a better way to explore similarities and perhaps verify that voting patterns exist at even a party-level… Let us try MDS. MDS transforms multidimensional data into a 2D projection so that similar data instances lie close to each other.

MDS can plot a multidimensional data in 2D so that similar data points lie close to each other. But sometimes this optimization is hard. This is why we have grey lines connecting the dots – the dots connected are similar at the selected cut-off level (Show similar pairs slider).

 

Ah, this is nice! We even colored data points by the party. MDS beautifully shows the coalition (blue dots) and the opposition (all other colors). Even parties are clustered together. But there are some outliers. Let us inspect Matej Tonin, who is quite far away from his orange group. Seems like he was missing at the last two sessions and did not vote. Hence his voting is treated differently.

Data Table is a handy tool for instant data inspection. It is always great to check, what is on the output of each widget.

 

It is always great to inspect discovered groups and outliers. This way an expert can interpret the clusters and also explain, what outliers mean. Sometimes it is simply a matter of data (missing values), but sometimes we could find shifting alliances. Perhaps an outlier could be an MP about to switch to another party.

The final workflow.

 

You can have fun with these data, too. Let us know if you discover something interesting!

 

Image Analytics: Clustering

Data does not always come in a nice tabular form. It can also be a collection of text, audio recordings, video materials or even images. However, computers can only work with numbers, so for any data mining, we need to transform such unstructured data into a vector representation.

For retrieving numbers from unstructured data, Orange can use deep network embedders. We have just started to include various embedders in Orange, and for now, they are available for text and images.

Related: Video on image clustering

Here, we give an example of image embedding and show how easy is to use it in Orange. Technically, Orange would send the image to the server, where the server would push an image through a pre-trained deep neural network, like Google’s Inception v3. Deep networks were most often trained with some special purpose in mind. Inception v3, for instance, can classify images into any of 1000 image classes. We can disregard the classification, consider instead the penultimate layer of the network with 2048 nodes (numbers) and use that for image’s vector-based representation.

Let’s see this on an example.

Here we have 19 images of domestic animals. First, download the images and unzip them. Then use Import Images widget from Orange’s Image Analytics add-on and open the directory containing the images.

We can visualize images in Image Viewer widget. Here is our workflow so far, with images shown in Image Viewer:

But what do we see in a data table? Only some useless description of images (file name, the location of the file, its size, and the image width and height).

This cannot help us with machine learning. As I said before, we need numbers. To acquire numerical representation of these images, we will send the images to Image Embedding widget.

Great! Now we have the numbers we wanted. There are 2048 of them (columns n0 to n2047). From now on, we can apply all the standard machine learning techniques, say, clustering.

Let us measure the distance between these images and see which are the most similar. We used Distances widget to measure the distance. Normally, cosine distance works best for images, but you can experiment on your own. Then we passed the distance matrix to Hierarchical Clustering to visualize similar pairs in a dendrogram.

This looks very promising! All the right animals are grouped together. But I can’t see the results so well in the dendrogram. I want to see the images – with Image Viewer!

So cool! All the cow family is grouped together! Now we can click on different branches of the dendrogram and observe which animals belong to which group.

But I know what you are going to say. You are going to say I am cheating. That I intentionally selected similar images to trick you.

I will prove you wrong. I will take a new cow, say, the most famous cow in Europe – Milka cow.

This image is quite different from the other images – it doesn’t have a white background, it’s a real (yet photoshopped) photo and the cow is facing us. Will the Image Embedding find the right numerical representation for this cow?

Indeed it has. Milka is nicely put together with all the other cows.

Image analytics is such an exciting field in machine learning and now Orange is a part of it too! You need to install the Image Analytics add on and you are all set for your research!

Text Mining: version 0.2.0

Orange3-Text has just recently been polished, updated and enhanced! Our GSoC student Alexey has helped us greatly to achieve another milestone in Orange development and release the latest 0.2.0 version of our text mining add-on. The new release, which is already available on PyPi, includes Wikipedia and SimHash widgets and a rehaul of Bag of Words, Topic Modeling and Corpus Viewer.

 

Wikipedia widget allows retrieving sources from Wikipedia API and can handle multiple queries. It serves as an easy data gathering source and it’s great for exploring text mining techniques. Here we’ve simply queried Wikipedia for articles on Slovenia and Germany and displayed them in Corpus Viewer.

wiki1
Query Wikipedia by entering your query word list in the widget. Put each query on a separate line and run Search.

 

Similarity Hashing widget computes similarity hashes for the given corpus, allowing the user to find duplicates, plagiarism or textual borrowing in the corpus. Here’s an example from Wikipedia, which has a pre-defined structure of articles, making our corpus quite similar. We’ve used Wikipedia widget and retrieved 10 articles for the query ‘Slovenia’. Then we’ve used Similarity Hashing to compute hashes for our text. What we got on the output is a table of 64 binary features (predefined in the SimHash widget), which denote a 64-bit hash size. Then we computed similarities in text by sending Similarity Hashing to Distances. Here we’ve selected cosine row distances and sent the output to Hierarchical Clustering. We can see that we have some similar documents, so we can select and inspect them in Corpus Viewer.

simhash1
Output of Similarity Hashing widget.
simhash
We’ve selected the two most similar documents in Hierarchical Clustering and displayed them in Corpus Viewer.

 

Topic Modeling now includes three modeling algorithms, namely Latent Semantic Indexing (LSP), Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA), and Hierarchical Dirichlet Process (HDP). Let’s query Twitter for the latest tweets from Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. First we preprocess the data and send the output to Topic Modeling. The widget suggests 10 topics, with the most significant words denoting each topic, and outputs topic probabilities for each document.

We can inspect distances between the topics with Distances (cosine) and Hierarchical Clustering. Seems like topics are not extremely author specific, since Hierarchical Clustering often puts Trump and Clinton in the same cluster. We’ve used Average linkage, but you can play around with different linkages and see if you can get better results.

topic-modelling
Example of comparing text by topics.

 

Now we connect Corpus Viewer to Preprocess Text. This is nothing new, but Corpus Viewer now displays also tokens and POS tags. Enable POS Tagger in Preprocess Text. Now open Corpus Viewer and tick the checkbox Show Tokens & Tags. This will display tagged token at the bottom of each document.

corpusviewer
Corpus Viewer can now display tokens and POS tags below each document.

 

This is just a brief overview of what one can do with the new Orange text mining functionalities. Of course, these are just exemplary workflows. If you did textual analysis with great results using any of these widgets, feel free to share it with us! 🙂

Explorative data analysis with Hierarchical Clustering

Today we will write about cluster analysis with Hierarchical Clustering widget. We use a well-known Iris data set, which contains 150 Iris flowers, each belonging to one of the three species (setosa, versicolor and virginica). To an untrained eye the three species are very alike, so how could we best tell them apart? The data set contains measurements of sepal and petal dimensions (width and length) and we assume that these gives rise to interesting clustering. But is this so?

Hierarchical Clustering workflow
Hierarchical Clustering workflow

 

To find clusters, we feed the data from the File widget to Distances and then into Hierarchical Clustering. The last widget in our workflow visualizes hierarchical clustering dendrogram. In the dendrogram, let us annotate the branches with the corresponding Iris species (Annotation = Iris). We see that not all the clusters are composed of the same actual class – there are some mixed clusters with both virginicas and versicolors.

Selected clusters in Hierarchical Clustering widget
Selected clusters in Hierarchical Clustering widget

 

To see these clusters, we select them in Hierarchical Clustering widget by clicking on a branch. Selected data will be fed into the output of this widget. Let us inspect the data we have selected by adding Scatter Plot and PCA widgets. If we draw a Data Table directly from Hierarchical Clustering, we see the selected instances and the clusters they belong to. But if we first add the PCA widget, which decomposes the data into principal components, and then connect it to Scatter Plot, we will see the selected instances in the adjusted scatter plot (where principal components are used for x and y-axis).

HierarchicalClustering-Example2

 

Select other clusters in Hierarchical Clustering widget to see how the scatter plot visualization changes. This allows for an interesting explorative data analysis through a combination of widgets for unsupervised learning and visualizations.